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women powering technology, part four

The fourth installment of our Women Powering Technology series features Chandelle Fairley, Managing Director, Randstad Technologies, which takes a closer look at the challenges of recruiting women in technology. Chandelle joined Randstad Technologies in 2009 and has over 17 years experience in the recruitment industry.  Starting as an account executive, she was promoted to Managing Director for the Atlanta-based Randstad Technologies office in July 2013. Chandelle is a multi-year President's Club winner, was named the 2012 Producer of the year and has been a top producer throughout her tenure at Randstad.  Chandelle has experienced great success in this industry through developing solid relationships with her clients internally and externally, which has carried over well in her new leadership role.  Along with her success professionally, Chandelle has been a key player in launching Randstad's most recent corporate social responsibility program.  She has assisted in building the pilot program to prepare ex-victims of human and sex trafficking for the workforce, with the ultimate goal to give victims the opportunity to earn an independent living. 

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women powering technology, part 3

The third installment of our Women Powering Technology series features Pam Stenson, President of the CIO Executive Council. She is charged with growing a community of the senior-most IT leaders across the world for the purpose of harnessing their thought leadership to evolve the IT profession. Pam manages the Council team to ensure world-class service delivery, sets the strategic direction of the organization, and works intimately with the Council’s member leadership and board of advisors. Pam has over 20 years experience in IT and has been a valuable part of the Council team since February of 2007. Since being named the general manager in February of 2009, she has also aligned her personal passions as the chair of the Council’s Youth in IT and Executive Women in IT member-working groups and serves as a board member for the ITWomen.org. -Kimberly Fahey, Vice President, Global Client Solutions at Randstad.

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women powering technology series, part two

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infographic: can women succeed in the tech sector?

While women in technology have made great strides, they still face many barriers, which is the focus of a comprehensive infographic from IT Manager Daily. Percentage of women earning IT-related degrees has declined Over the past 25 years, the proportion of females earning tech degrees has steadily dropped from 37 percent in 1985 to 18 percent in 2009.

A recent New York Times article titled “I Am Woman, Watch Me Hack” addresses possible reasons why fewer women are interested in tech degrees:

One of the biggest challenges, according to many in the industry, may be a public-image problem. Most young people … simply don’t come into contact with computer scientists and engineers in their daily lives, and they don’t really understand what they do. And to the extent that Americans do, “they think of Dilbert,” explains Jeffrey Wilcox, vice president of engineering at Lockheed Martin. (“Dilbert” being shorthand, of course, for boring, antisocial, cubicle-contained drudgery, conducted mostly by awkward men in short-sleeve dress shirts — a bit like “Office Space,” only worse.)
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women powering technology series, part one

Women Powering Business is pleased to introduce “Women Powering Technology,” a six-part series that takes a closer look at the lack of female representation in the IT industry. Topics in the series will include: What impact does the gender gap have on the IT industry overall? What’s the origin of the gender gap? How can tech companies attract and retain female talent? What are some barriers that women in tech face?

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How to Manage Tech-Savvy Millennials

The Millennial generation is taking the workforce by storm.

Born between 1982 and 1993, there are more than 80 million millennials -- making them the largest generation. By the year 2025, millennials will make up 75 percent of the global workforce, and they are sure to bring with them substantial changes.

So how do employers effectively manage this new crop of women workers who are tech-savvy, confident and expressive?

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Rules of Communication For Today’s Tech-Savvy World

With so many communication choices in today’s tech-savvy environment, interaction now comes with rules of engagement that mirror our high-speed surroundings.

But what’s the communication playbook in a world of email, voicemail and text messaging?

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Are You The Next Tech Superhero?

How many successful women in technology do you know?

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