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Randstad’s Women Powering Business Panel Series is our way to bring together business leaders in key markets throughout the United States, to connect with women at all stages of their careers, by providing networking opportunities and thoughtful discussion of the issues around gender diversity in the American workplace. We brought together a panel of dynamic leaders from civic, academic, business, HR and philanthropic backgrounds. Moderated by Randstad North American CEO, Linda Galipeau, this year’s panelists include: September 10th, 2014 Chicago: a cocktail event

September 12th, 2014 Minneapolis: a breakfast event Read More

the “not sorry” campaign: randstad women leaders weigh in

When Pantene released a video examining the way women overuse the word "sorry," it got the public talking about the power of language and how women are so quick to apologize for things that aren't their fault. Whether it's habit or learned behavior, many women use this five-letter word as a way to appear softer and more likeable -- especially in the workplace. But is it time for women to stop apologizing so much? "Sorry is a crutch — a tyrannical lady-crutch," according to a Time article. "It’s a space filler, a hedge, a way to politely ask for something without offending." According to another Boston Globe article: "It’s not that we’re actually sorry, but it’s that we think we’re consistently doing things we should be apologizing for. And that’s an even bigger problem." Six Randstad women leaders have shared their own experiences of apologizing when it wasn't necessary --  and they've offered women workers some advice on how to rethink their use of the word "sorry."

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the confidence gap, part 2: mentoring millennials

The media attention surrounding The Confidence Code -- a popular book written by journalists Katty Kay and Claire Shipman --has raised awareness around how working women may be holding themselves back from leadership positions due to their own lack of self-confidence. But where do Millennials fit in? Known for their ambition, self-awareness and high-education, do Millennial women (born between 1982 and 1994) fall prey to the confidence gap too? Baby Boomers Lean Back, Millennials Lean In According to Trang Chu at The Guardian, “While this may be true for a generation of Baby Boomers where women were taught to speak apologetically and lean back from their careers, we could argue this is not the case with the Millennial generation.” According to Randstad’s most recent Engagement Study, Millennials and Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) have differing views when it comes to the future of women in the workplace, with Millennials having a more favorable outlook. CNBC projects that Millennials will comprise 75 percent of the global workforce by 2025, so the younger generation’s shifting perceptions of women and leadership could mean positive changes ahead for working women. For example, both men and women respondents answered the three questions below as part of our Engagement Study. Notice the contrasting view among Millennials and Baby Boomers:

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gender leadership styles: is it really man versus vs. woman?

 

GENDER LEADERSHIP STYLES: IS IT REALLY MAN VERSUS VS. WOMAN?

Communication skills: (45 percent of men and 49 percent of women)Effective leaders frequently exude an identifiable style. Female leaders are often known for their ability to listen and multitask, while their male counterparts are praised for being strong and aggressive.But do valuable leadership qualities stem from gender or are they developed over time from life experiences?

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infographic: can women succeed in the tech sector?

While women in technology have made great strides, they still face many barriers, which is the focus of a comprehensive infographic from IT Manager Daily. Percentage of women earning IT-related degrees has declined Over the past 25 years, the proportion of females earning tech degrees has steadily dropped from 37 percent in 1985 to 18 percent in 2009.

A recent New York Times article titled “I Am Woman, Watch Me Hack” addresses possible reasons why fewer women are interested in tech degrees:

One of the biggest challenges, according to many in the industry, may be a public-image problem. Most young people … simply don’t come into contact with computer scientists and engineers in their daily lives, and they don’t really understand what they do. And to the extent that Americans do, “they think of Dilbert,” explains Jeffrey Wilcox, vice president of engineering at Lockheed Martin. (“Dilbert” being shorthand, of course, for boring, antisocial, cubicle-contained drudgery, conducted mostly by awkward men in short-sleeve dress shirts — a bit like “Office Space,” only worse.)
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getting – and keeping – women on the leadership track

 
 
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How To Build Employee Morale

As the economy continues its steady trek toward improvement, how engaged are your employees?

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Sponsors vs. Mentors: What’s the Difference?

For women looking to open the c-suite door, sponsors may hold the key.

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Lessons in Leadership

Have you ever heard women in the workplace use phrases like “I feel” or “I don’t know much about this, but…” to preface a thought? Or, maybe you’ve used language like this yourself?

The truth is, such subtle preluding clauses are common among female employees, but self-effacing behaviors like this could be holding women back as they strive to claim positions of power in the workplace.

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How to become an authentic leader

Navigating office relationships can be tricky, particularly for those in leadership positions. From strictly professional to more personal, how leaders interact with their employees, can set the tone for the entire office. Therefore, striking the right balance is critical to achieving a cohesive and trusting workplace.

According to Randstad’s most recent gender engagement study, 84 percent of women agree that their relationship with their direct supervisor has a big impact on how happy they are with their job. While oversharing can diminish one’s authority, not sharing enough can make managers seem disinterested and closed-off.

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