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forget perfect

 

My gift to myself this year is to read this book again. This book, Forget Perfect, was a lifesaver for me 10 years ago at a time when I was figuring out how to balance a growing family, aging parents and a husband’s equally challenging work/travel schedule with climbing my way up the corporate ladder

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part 5: women powering technology


The fifth installment of our Women Powering Technology series features Helen Drinan, President of Simmons College, a Boston-based, private women's college established in 1899. She is the eighth President of Simmons College and the former Chair of the Simmons College Board of Trustees. Previously, Drinan was Senior Vice President of Human Resources at Caritas Christi Health Care. She also served as President and CEO of the Society of Human Resources Management and as Executive Vice President of Human Resources for BankBoston. In 2001, she was named a Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources, and in 2007 she received the John D. Erdlen Five Star Award — the highest award given annually by the Northeast Human Resource Association. -Kimberly Fahey, Vice President, Global Client Solutions at Randstad

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join the conversation in chicago and minneapolis.

Randstad’s Women Powering Business Panel Series is our way to bring together business leaders in key markets throughout the United States, to connect with women at all stages of their careers, by providing networking opportunities and thoughtful discussion of the issues around gender diversity in the American workplace. We brought together a panel of dynamic leaders from civic, academic, business, HR and philanthropic backgrounds. Moderated by Randstad North American CEO, Linda Galipeau, this year’s panelists include: September 10th, 2014 Chicago: a cocktail event

September 12th, 2014 Minneapolis: a breakfast event Read More

women, stress, and the workplace

Women are making greater strides than ever before, both at work and at home.

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women powering technology, part four

The fourth installment of our Women Powering Technology series features Chandelle Fairley, Managing Director, Randstad Technologies, which takes a closer look at the challenges of recruiting women in technology. Chandelle joined Randstad Technologies in 2009 and has over 17 years experience in the recruitment industry.  Starting as an account executive, she was promoted to Managing Director for the Atlanta-based Randstad Technologies office in July 2013. Chandelle is a multi-year President's Club winner, was named the 2012 Producer of the year and has been a top producer throughout her tenure at Randstad.  Chandelle has experienced great success in this industry through developing solid relationships with her clients internally and externally, which has carried over well in her new leadership role.  Along with her success professionally, Chandelle has been a key player in launching Randstad's most recent corporate social responsibility program.  She has assisted in building the pilot program to prepare ex-victims of human and sex trafficking for the workforce, with the ultimate goal to give victims the opportunity to earn an independent living. 

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women powering technology, part 3

The third installment of our Women Powering Technology series features Pam Stenson, President of the CIO Executive Council. She is charged with growing a community of the senior-most IT leaders across the world for the purpose of harnessing their thought leadership to evolve the IT profession. Pam manages the Council team to ensure world-class service delivery, sets the strategic direction of the organization, and works intimately with the Council’s member leadership and board of advisors. Pam has over 20 years experience in IT and has been a valuable part of the Council team since February of 2007. Since being named the general manager in February of 2009, she has also aligned her personal passions as the chair of the Council’s Youth in IT and Executive Women in IT member-working groups and serves as a board member for the ITWomen.org. -Kimberly Fahey, Vice President, Global Client Solutions at Randstad.

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the “not sorry” campaign: randstad women leaders weigh in

When Pantene released a video examining the way women overuse the word "sorry," it got the public talking about the power of language and how women are so quick to apologize for things that aren't their fault. Whether it's habit or learned behavior, many women use this five-letter word as a way to appear softer and more likeable -- especially in the workplace. But is it time for women to stop apologizing so much? "Sorry is a crutch — a tyrannical lady-crutch," according to a Time article. "It’s a space filler, a hedge, a way to politely ask for something without offending." According to another Boston Globe article: "It’s not that we’re actually sorry, but it’s that we think we’re consistently doing things we should be apologizing for. And that’s an even bigger problem." Six Randstad women leaders have shared their own experiences of apologizing when it wasn't necessary --  and they've offered women workers some advice on how to rethink their use of the word "sorry."

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the confidence gap, part 2: mentoring millennials

The media attention surrounding The Confidence Code -- a popular book written by journalists Katty Kay and Claire Shipman --has raised awareness around how working women may be holding themselves back from leadership positions due to their own lack of self-confidence. But where do Millennials fit in? Known for their ambition, self-awareness and high-education, do Millennial women (born between 1982 and 1994) fall prey to the confidence gap too? Baby Boomers Lean Back, Millennials Lean In According to Trang Chu at The Guardian, “While this may be true for a generation of Baby Boomers where women were taught to speak apologetically and lean back from their careers, we could argue this is not the case with the Millennial generation.” According to Randstad’s most recent Engagement Study, Millennials and Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) have differing views when it comes to the future of women in the workplace, with Millennials having a more favorable outlook. CNBC projects that Millennials will comprise 75 percent of the global workforce by 2025, so the younger generation’s shifting perceptions of women and leadership could mean positive changes ahead for working women. For example, both men and women respondents answered the three questions below as part of our Engagement Study. Notice the contrasting view among Millennials and Baby Boomers:

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gender leadership styles: is it really man versus vs. woman?

 

GENDER LEADERSHIP STYLES: IS IT REALLY MAN VERSUS VS. WOMAN?

Communication skills: (45 percent of men and 49 percent of women)Effective leaders frequently exude an identifiable style. Female leaders are often known for their ability to listen and multitask, while their male counterparts are praised for being strong and aggressive.But do valuable leadership qualities stem from gender or are they developed over time from life experiences?

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women powering technology series, part two

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